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Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education

07 Fév

Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal.

Special Issue on Migration, Religion, and Education.

Call for Papers

 

Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal invites contributions for an upcoming guest edited volume on Migration, Religion, and Education. This special issue invites papers from a diversity of international perspectives and country contexts, and from a variety of education disciplines, to address the theme of migration, religion, and education. Education should be considered broadly to include all stages / levels of formal education, as well as non-formal and informal education.

The continuing salience of religion as a fundamental basis for identity and belonging, and as an on-going focal point of political struggles across the world has shaken to its core the narrative projecting a final « global triumph » of liberal democracy in the post-Cold War era. Religion still matters a great deal, both publicly and privately. And religion has always had important linkages to migration and cultural diversity. As Bramadat (2009) indicates, religion is quite powerfully related to many of the most complex features of migration today; it is often involved in conflicts driving people to flee their home countries, it is used in political resistance struggles (both in the « homeland » and the diaspora), and it very typically serves as a foundation for the social structures of newly arrived minority communities in host societies. Each of these illustrations has important connections to education; religiously persecuted refugees may utilize their cultural (and specifically religious) capital to their advantage in schooling in host societies that privilege rather than severely disadvantage their faith traditions, diasporic communities may use non-formal and informal education methods to mobilize their members around a religiously framed cause, churches and mosques may create schools within immigrant neighborhoods to serve as anchors for the passing on of tradition as well as the cultivation of ethno-specific forms of social capital.

This special issue invites papers from a diversity of international perspectives and country contexts, and from a variety of education disciplines, to address the theme of migration, religion, and education. Education should be considered broadly to include all stages / levels of formal education, as well as non-formal and informal education.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:
• religion and identity among migrant students
• the « problematization » of religious minority students in host society schools
• representation of migrant’s religions in school curriculum
• religious literacy among education policy makers
• religious awareness among teachers and administrators
• religion as a form of cultural capital among migrant students
• religion and migrant teachers
• court decisions bearing on the religious identities and practices of migrant students

Please send abstracts to Bruce Collet colleba@bgsu.edu by February 15, 2012.
Responses to submitted abstracts will be sent by April 2012. Full article submissions from invited papers will be due July 1, 2012. Papers invited for the special issue will undergo blind review procedures.

Reviews of relevant books are also encouraged.

ABTRACTS should be submitted according to the following format:
(TITLE)
(AUTHOR/S FULL NAME)
(AUTHOR/S AFFILIATION AND FULL ADDRESS INCLUDING E-MAIL)
(ABSTRACT UP TO 600 WORDS NOT INCLUDING REFERENCES- TIME NEW ROMAN 12 POINTS)
(REFERENCES)

Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: An International Journal (Taylor & Francis; http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?issn=1559-5692&linktype=1) is a quarterly peer-reviewed journal focused on critical discourse and research in diaspora, indigenous, and minority education. The journal is dedicated to researching cultural sustainability in a world increasingly consolidating under national, transnational, and global organizations. It aims to draw attention to, and learn from, the many initiatives being conducted around the globe in support of diaspora, indigenous, and minority education, which might otherwise go unnoticed.

 

Bruce Collet, PhD
Assistant Professor
Educational Foundations and Inquiry
School of Leadership & Policy Studies
College of Education & Human Development
Bowling Green State University
569 Education Building
Ph. 419-372-7354
Email: colleba@bgsu.edu
 
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Publié par le février 7, 2012 dans Calls / Appels

 

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